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“I’m a 5’ blonde from Ohio and my last boyfriend was a pastor.” And oh yeah–I love doing abortions.

Posted on December 30, 2015

(This originall appeared on Intercessors for America)

Who better to show care, concern, love and equality to women than your local abortion doctor?  That is what Carolyn Payne, a young, Midwestern “Christian” abortionist thinks.  Her take on abortion is stunning, and punctuated by the fact that she is a seemingly otherwise Conservative young lady from Ohio.  Obviously, this young lady (and those she treats) need our prayers for a clear and honest view of what abortionists really provide.  Pain. Death. Regret. Humiliation. Worthlessness. Guilt. Callousness. (Just to name a few of the “benefits” she really provides to women.)  Read the story from Life News to find out more about Carolyn’s story and pray for her blinders to be removed.

From Life News:

Carolyn Payne grew up in a good Christian home with loving parents and opportunities to make the most of her life.

Instead, she decided to become an abortion doctor.

Payne, an Ob/Gyn resident (pictured above), wrote a shockingly bold column for the women’s website XO Jane about how her faith and upbringing influenced her to abort unborn babies for a living. Through her experiences, Payne flaunted her career goal and what she perceived as the importance of training programs for abortion doctors in the U.S.

“I love providing abortion care to women, and I am proud to do so,” Payne wrote, adding that she and many of her colleagues are “not afraid, embarrassed or ashamed to say so.”

Payne explained:  Who wants to be an abortion provider?

I do. And I don’t have a nose-ring or a tattoo. I’m a 5’ blonde from Ohio and my last boyfriend was a pastor. In fact my Midwest, Christian upbringing is largely responsible for my belief that providing abortion services is one of the most meaningful ways I feel I can contribute to making the world a more fair and equal place for women.

… I never experienced unplanned pregnancy because I was fortunate enough to have parents who understood the normalcy of teenage sexuality, and provided me education and opportunities to prevent undesired pregnancy and disease. I could have sex, just like a man could, and go on with my life, with minimal fear of life-changing consequences (i.e. unwanted pregnancy).

I realize this is a privilege in our society and that is unjust. All women who desire contraception should have it; it’s necessary for women to be able to achieve their goals. Not because women are sluts, but because women are humans, and humans do have sex.

Payne clearly is very proud of her abortion work. In one revolting admission, she openly admitted that aborting an unborn baby for the first time made her and other abortion doctors-in-training “feel good” — though Payne never mentioned unborn babies in her column. She wrote:

To us, abortion training was something we advocated for in medical school, and actively sought out in our residency training programs. To us, abortion training was exciting, because it meant we were developing the skills necessary to provide women with safe reproductive healthcare. To many of us, the decision to receive training in abortion wasn’t “agonizing” at all as a recent corresponding piece inYahoo! Health described. Rather, providing our first MVA [manual vacuum aspiration abortion] was a “feel good procedure,” because we had successfully performed an intervention that changed a woman’s life for the better!

No where did Payne mention what happens to the unborn child in an MVA abortion – how the unborn baby’s body is crushed and sliced and then suctioned out of the mother’s womb. Then the baby’s body parts are typically put into a bowl to make sure they are all there. This gruesome killing procedure was “exciting” to Payne.

But her shocking admissions did not end there. Payne argued that abortion makes life more “fair” for women who did not have the education or resources to prevent their pregnancies or simply thought a baby would get in the way of their education or career. She also claimed that abortions are “fair” to children:

And most importantly, I think it is fair to children, that they are born into a world where they are wanted, and loved, and cared for, and have the resources they need to thrive. I think abortion is a social good and a tremendous way in which physicians can contribute to a more socially just world.

Payne concluded with thoughts about possibly becoming pregnant in the future. Abortion is already in her mind if her “pregnancy” does not turn out as expected (no mention of her unborn child)– “I hope that my doctor will put my life and health first.”

That means I hope my doctor is trained to terminate pregnancies. I hope they get that training in medical school, residency, fellowship, and beyond. I also hope they feel good about it, because it is a good thing. Saving women’s lives, and enabling women to have both the public and private life she desires is a very good thing.

Payne’s musings are a disquieting look at how abortion doctors justify their horrific treatment – by completely ignoring the humanity of the unborn child.